Can signage be installed to help save Little Bay’s marine life?

Can signage be installed as a first step towards saving Little Bay’s marine life?

At Gordon’s Bay recently, I noticed prominent signage which makes it clear that collecting of marine life is not permitted and explains why:

Collecting is not allowed at Gordons Bay

Collecting is not allowed at Gordons Bay

Little Bay has no such signage, and is enduring yet again the annual “rape of the bay”. This is when people who otherwise never visit arrive in large groups at the time of the extreme Christmas low tides and the Christmas-January public holiday low tides and remove all the sea urchins and other edible sea creatures they can find.

The bay is not recovering from this annual pillage, and in terms of marine life, has virtually become a dead bay. On this subject, please also see this blog’s February 2011 post Should Little Bay be a Marine Reserve?.

A secondary issue that should concern all beach users is the behaviour of sea urchin gatherers who carelessly leave the shells and spines of these creatures on the sand and in the water where swimmers and sunbathers can tread on them; sea urchin spine injuries are painful and the spines difficult to remove, sometimes requiring medical attention.

I will be contacting Randwick City Council to try to get signage similar to that at Gordon’s Bay installed at Little Bay. If I have your support, please let me know by posting a comment or by emailing fagan dot peter at gmail dot com.

Advertisements

Pumice from Pacific volcano reaches Little Bay

Over recent weeks, beachgoers have noticed large amounts of pumice washed up on Little Bay beach.

The source of the pumice is the Havre seamount, an undersea volcano that erupted 18-21 July 2012.

Pumice from the Havre seamount volcano washed ashore at Little Bay

Pumice from the Havre seamount volcano washed ashore at Little Bay

Pumice from the Havre seamount volcano washed ashore at Little Bay

Pumice from the Havre seamount volcano at Little Bay

The volcano is located near L’Esperance and L’Havre islands at the southern end of the Kermadec Island group. The Kermadecs are around 800 km north-east of New Zealand’s North Island and a similar distance south-west of Tonga.

The eruption generated a 20,000 square kilometre pumice raft that has gradually dispersed throughout the South Pacific. Pumice from it was observed on the Great Barrier Reef earlier this year and subsequently on the NSW North Coast. It has now spread as far south as Mollymook.

Further information:

Coastal walkway route at Little Bay

Randwick City Council is attempting to design a route for the coastal walkway south from Malabar, around Buchan Point to Little Bay and then on to the Coast Cemetery. This route must run adjacent to four golf courses with ocean frontages – from north to south, Randwick, The Coast, St Michaels and New South Wales.

Coastal walkway extension & south of Coogee. Map © Fairfax Media

Coastal walkway extension – south of Coogee. Map © Fairfax Media

Designing a walkway on which walkers will be safe from golf balls and discouraged from straying onto the golf courses is challenging. It would be a shame to see a lot of fencing to restrict access and a proliferation of protective screens along the coastline.

Perhaps it will be possible to drop the track below the cliff tops in some places – although such sections of track would be expensive and dangerous to construct and maintain.

At Little Bay, the layout of The Coast golf course will require walkers to walk along the beach, although access will be restricted at high tide and an alternative route may be needed.

Survey mark, Little Bay beach, April 2013

Survey mark, Little Bay beach, April 2013

Survey mark, Little Bay beach, April 2013

Survey mark, Little Bay beach, April 2013

Christo on Self Improvement Wednesday

Christo, the Bulgarian-born environmental artist who, with his partner Jeanne-Claude and many volunteers, ‘wrapped’ Little Bay in 1969 will be the topic of Self Improvement Wednesday on ABC Radio 702 Sydney, at 5:15 PM, Wednesday 16 October 2013.

Richard Glover will question Elizabeth Ann Macgregor, Director of Sydney’s Museum of Contemporary Art, about Christo’s life and career.

Wrapped Coast – One Million Square Feet, Little Bay, Sydney, Australia, 1968–69

Wrapped Coast – One Million Square Feet, Little Bay, Sydney, Australia, 1968–69. Photo: Harry Shunk.

If you miss the broadcast, it will be available for download from 16 October on the 702 website.

For more information on Wrapped Coast, go to:

Dead turtle at Little Bay

A large dead turtle was found on the rocks at the northern end of Little Bay on Saturday 29 September.

P1060646_529

National Parks and Wildlife Service was contacted by email on Sunday evening and staff from the La Perouse depot collected the turtle on Monday morning and took it to Taronga Park Zoo for a post mortem.

According to Paul Ibbetson of NPWS, turtles turn up regularly on the NSW coast, coming down from the north on the east coast current. It’s really too cold for them this far south so the weaker ones usually don’t survive.

Thanks to Paul Ibbetson and his staff at NPWS for this information, and for their prompt response to the request to have the turtle removed and properly disposed of before it decomposed.

Rescue at dusk – Sunday 15 September

Someone appears to have raised the alarm about two teenage bodyboard riders making their way back to Little Bay at dusk from the south in moderate to rough seas.

Two choppers

Two choppers …

Hover over lifesaver who has come around from Malabar on a jet ski ...

Hover over lifesaver who has come around from Malabar on a jet ski …

And tows the first of the two board riders ...

And tows the first of the two board riders …

Who is met by two coppers ...

Who is met by two coppers …

Before being joined by his mate

Before being joined by his mate

According to the Southern Courier report, the boys got into trouble after one of them lost his bodyboard. It would have been be a good idea for the boys to have headed home a little earlier – like before the sun had set.

After the rescue the lifesaver headed back to Malabar as night fell.

Flannel flowers and other natives in full flower

Despite the dry weather, the Flannel flowers (Actinotus helianthi) and many other natives are in full flower on the hillside to the east of the northern creek.

All images © Peter Fagan.

Coast Centre for Seniors art exhibition on Malabar Headland

The Coast Centre for Seniors is holding an art exhibition devoted to works depicting Malabar Headland.

The exhibition is mounted in the centre’s new Hills Gallery.

Due to the high level of interest, the exhibition will be open Saturday and Sunday 24 and 25 August between 10am and 3pm, as well as each week day until 31 August.

For details on the Coast Centre, click here.

Clarence Stockee, Indigenous Flora Educator at the Royal Botanic Gardens, opening the exhibition, with Linda Mearing, Coast Centre Manager and Peter Fagan, Friends of Malabar Headland Chairperson

Clarence Stockee – Indigenous Flora Educator at the Royal Botanic Gardens, opening the exhibition, with Linda Mearing, Coast Centre Manager and Peter Fagan, Friends of Malabar Headland Chairperson

Judge Antoinette Starkiewicz with the 6 finalists (winner at centre top, runner up below )

Judge Antoinette Starkiewicz with the 6 finalists (Yvonne Phillips winning entry at centre top, Peter Fagan’s runner up below)

Prize winner Yvonne Phillips beside her winning entry – Boora Point seen from the south side of Long Bay

Prize winner Yvonne Phillips beside her winning entry – Boora Point seen from the south side of Long Bay

Professor Clement Boughton on ABC Radio National

Emeritus Professor Clement Boughton spoke on the Ockham’s Razor program on Radio National on Sunday, 4 August at 7.45 AM. The subject of Dr Broughton’s talk was the Coast Hospital / Prince Henry Hospital and its role in the treatment of infectious diseases in New South Wales.

Dr Boughton is the author of The Coast Chronicle and his wife Joy is a poet, well known locally for her collection The Coast and Other Poems.

Charter Hall site continues to release sediment into Little Bay during June

With periods of heavy rain and showers during June 2013, the Charter Hall site continued to release sediment into Little Bay throughout the month.

Sunday 2 June 2013

Shallow sedimentation pond at the Charter Hall site

Shallow sedimentation pond at the Charter Hall site

Middle creek, heavy with sediment from the Charter Hall site

Middle creek, heavy with sediment from the Charter Hall site

By comparison, the northern creek which does not drain the Charter Hall site runs clear after the heavy rain

By comparison, the northern creek which does not drain the Charter Hall site runs clear after the heavy rain

Middle creek, heavy with sediment from the Charter Hall site, just before it enters Little Bay

Middle creek, heavy with sediment from the Charter Hall site, just before it enters Little Bay

Little Bay at the mouth of the sediment laden creek

Little Bay at the mouth of the sediment laden creek

Sunday 23 June 2013

The middle creek in flood, water laden with sediment from the CHarter Hall site

The middle creek in flood, water laden with sediment from the Charter Hall site

Sediment laden water spoils the northern end of the beach for another day

Sediment laden water spoils the northern end of the beach for another day

Heavy sediment load in the bay at mouth of middle creek

Heavy sediment load in Little Bay at mouth of middle creek

Closeup – heavy sediment load in the bay

Closeup – heavy sediment load in the bay

Closeup – heavy sediment load in the bay

Closeup – heavy sediment load in the bay

Saturday 29 June 2013

Sediment load spreads into the bay from the mouth of the middle creek

Sediment load spreads into the bay from the mouth of the middle creek

Sediment load spreads across the bay from the mouth of the middle creek

Sediment load spreads across the bay from the mouth of the middle creek

Sediment load spreads across the bay

Sediment load spreads across the bay