When presented with evidence of the failure of erosion and sedimentation (ERSED) controls at the ex-UNSW site on Anzac Parade, the developer Charter Hall, through a spokesperson, stated to the Southern Courier community newspaper:

“a comprehensive site-wide erosion and sedimentation control plan was in place at Little Bay”

The plan may be comprehensive on paper or as a theory in some manager’s mind, but it is NOT WORKINGlook at the photographs.

Stockpiles and spoil heaps on the site are not protected by geofabric. Rain falling on them creates rills in the loose soil. These carry sediment to the creek and on into Little Bay.

Rills are clearly visible on the faces of the stockpiles

Rills are clearly visible on the faces of the stockpiles

Rills are clearly visible on the faces of the stockpiles

Rills are clearly visible on the faces of the spoil heaps

The works have not been staged, and as a result, the entire 11.42 hectare site is devoid of vegetation.

The existing lakes, which could have acted as sediment retention basins, were decommissioned and adequate replacements were not installed.

With these flaws visible to any observer, it is not possible to accept the developer’s claim that a comprehensive site-wide erosion and sedimentation control plan is in place.

Charter Hall also state as a defence that the water was tested by an independent environmental hygienist. However this is not a water hygiene issue. No-one is suggesting that the water is bacteriologically unclean or contaminated with toxins. We are saying that when it rains heavily, the water is laden with sediment and it is damaging the environment of Little Bay beach.

Charter Hall, Little Bay beach is a key component of your project marketing, so please get your erosion and sedimentation problem under control and stop damaging our bay.

For the Southern Courier article, click here and go to the 21 May 2013 edition, page 20-21.

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